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Showing some respect to the guys who really work hard for a living

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I really admire some of my fellow Filipino who are really working hard, doing a decent job to feed their family.

On this page I want to introduce a few

Being 'self employed'
We have to face the truth: The Philippines are a third part country and only slowly on the way to change this. It needs time and effort to make remarkable changings in the whole system. But this is up to the Government. The normal Filipino has to take care his own life and family because there is no Department of public welfare in the Philippines. If you can't work or have no kids who will take care you when you are old, you have to work till you die or need to beg for daily needs. Harsh but sadly the truth. And it is one of the reason why even a poor family try to raise some kids up, suffer daily struggles to give this kids a chance to become a proper education because this kids are their only chance for times, when the parents become old.

I know what I am talking about because I come from such poor conditions and because of this and the fact, that my life has turn to better, I want you to know about this guys and ask you to support them by buying something from them, if you have the chance for this.

Taho vendor Actually I am living in a remote area of Manila and feel pampered by the 'house delivering service' some guys are doing here: It start already early in the morning when the guy with the 'Taho' is passing my house. He is carrying two metal pails the whole day (or till he could sell all). One contains the 'Taho', the other one the additional ingredients and different sizes of cups, some Stroh and change.

The next one is following only short time later and offering 'Isda' (fish): Also carrying two bowls with fish and some ice below. Walking slowly along every street, to give time to possible customers and offering his fish by shouting "Isdaaaa".

The next guy you can expect is for breakfast time, offering the traditional 'Pansit'. A mix of small rice noodles, little veggies, a little bit flesh and a small lemon named 'Dalandan'. It's already covered in a small plastic bag and enough for a nice breakfast.

Just in time, before you start to prepare lunch, you will hear on the street the vendor offering several kinds of 'Gulay' (veggie). Some can offer daily different kinds, some are offering daily only one kind but as always: You don't need to go to the market just to buy few things you may need for your daily meal.

In the early afternoon, just right for 'Meryenda' you maybe can hear someone is offering 'Lumpia' (Spring rolls with veggie inside) or other snacks.

While the whole day you can hear often additional offers from guys, who try to earn in a decent but hard way for a living: 'Damit' (clothes), a mattress (folded into 3 pieces), plastic hanger or hair clips, 'Kaserola' (pans) or asking for empty bottles. Collecting them and paying you a little amount for each bottle.

Ice cream lottery The guy who is selling so called 'dirty Ice cream' is easily to hear because he is using a little bell to make sure, you can hear him coming. Normally he was offering only the simple one for 5 PHP each. My husband like the taste from the green 'Buko' (Coconut flavor) and we often refill our stock in the freezer. Since few weeks the vendor comes out with a lottery for a better Ice cream (10 PHP each): You pay 1 PHP for the chance to pick a sticker with only 2 numbers. If your sticker shows 3 numbers... you lost. But my husband never play the lotto. He always pay the regular price. That's his way to support this guy.

After sunset, when the night falls, the day will end with the vendor who is offering the 'Balot'. An egg from a duck, 14 - 16 days old with already a little chicken inside. It will be sold cooked to you. They say, it will give you strength and if you feel thick, it will help to cure. But honestly... I prefer a Faith healer or a real medicine or as a daily dose, some vitamins.

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